Employment Instability Among Younger Workers

About the study

This study examined young workers experiencing employment instability in the Canadian labour market. Using Statistics Canada’s Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (2007-2009), the study analyzed employment instability rates of non-student young workers between the ages 16 to 29. Employment instability was categorized into temporary job (full-time or part-time), involuntary part-time job, voluntary part-time job, or neither enrolled nor employed.

 

What can be learned from this study?

• More than half of non-student young workers between the ages 16 to 29 who worked in 2007 were found working temporary full-time and part-time jobs two years later, while 19 percent were unemployed.

• Compared to men (21 percent), more women (27 percent) experienced employment instability by working in part-time jobs. However, men were more likely to work in temporary jobs than women.

• Younger workers (23 or less) were much more likely to experience employment instability by working in part-time and temporary jobs than workers who were in their mid to late 20s.

• Young workers with only high school diploma had higher rates of employment instability than those with post-secondary education.

• People working in management and natural science occupations experienced less employment instability compared to those working in sales and service occupations.

 

What method(s) did the study use?

Analysis of Statistics Canada’s Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) (2007-2009)