Working in a Regulated Occupation in Canada: an Immigrant – Native-born Comparison

About the study

The study examined the issue of immigrants’ foreign credential recognition for regulated and unregulated occupations in Canada. Using Canada’s National Occupational Classification and Labour Force Survey (2008), the study compared the occupational outcomes of immigrants and the native-born Canadians, and immigrants’ returns to education in a regulated occupation.

 

What can be learned from this study?

While the proportions of immigrants and the native-born Canadians employed in regulated occupations are comparable, immigrants are less likely to be employed in regulated occupations.

• More immigrants (70 percent) have obtained post-secondary education than the native-born Canadians (65 percent).

• Immigrants who have received their education from Asian countries are less likely to be in a regulated occupation than those educated in the United States or Europe.

• Immigrants educated and trained in health, social sciences, education, and government are less likely to be employed in regulated occupations than someone who is trained in applied sciences.

• Recent immigrants are less likely to work in a regulated occupation than long-term immigrants.

 

What method(s) did the study use?

Descriptive and regression analyses of the National Occupational Classification and 2008 Labour Force Survey